Thursday, 19 August 2010

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

Every once in a while we receive an email to our Style Salvage inbox that brightens up our day. As you can imagine our email account is crammed full with all kinds of weird and wonderful press releases but there was one afternoon last week where we received two wide smile inducing correspondence from readers. One of which came from Louis Hunter who opened my eyes to a style rich film in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning...

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Hi Steve,

I'm a big fan of the blog and always look forward to the next post. Like you, I to am longing for autumn to commence as I do every year at around this time. The need to reintroduce those garments that have been in hibernation over the summer months is growing ever stronger. In response to your post on Gainsbourg a personal favorite film of mine is 'Saturday night and Sunday Morning'. I'm not sure of your already aware of it but if your ever in need of nostalgic trip to Northern England then this is perfect film especially in preparation for the cooler months ahead. The clothes of Arthur Seaton, played by Albert Finney are spot on throughout and Shirley Anne Field is not exactly hard on the eyes. I just thought I would share this with you as it is something which I very much enjoyed. Keep up the blogging as it brings us all much enjoyment,

Yours Sincerely,

L Hunter.

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Now, I had a vague idea that I might have watched Saturday Night and Sunday Morning during an almost forgotten wet afternoon but I couldn't be sure. Intrigued by the email, I managed to get my hands on a copy of the film, made myself some popcorn and sat down to a classic piece of 60s filmography. The film is based on Silitoe's novel in which he focuses on the life of Arthur Seaton, a young man who endures working in a factory all week so that he can afford to drink and chase women on Saturday evening.

"I'm out for a good time - all the rest is propaganda!"
Arthur Seaton

In his first starring role, Albert Finney gained international acclaim for his impressive portrayal of the rebellious factory worker. The sights and sounds of industrial Nottingham resonate with a grimy thud as Arthur Seaton works his tedious factory job. Through strong ale, women and practical jokes, he vents his frustrations against the establishments of work and marriage until his reckless ways lead him to a night that changes his life...















Clothes play a signficant role in highlighting the key themes of the film. Every Friday Seaton quickly escapes from work wearing his grubby overalls and plaid shirt before transforming in to a gentleman of the night. Seaton might still live at home with his parents in a tiny room but his wardrobe is bursting with outerwear, well cut tailoring and tie options. While offering a nostalgic trip of working class life in Northern England the Midlands the film showcases a wardrobe that is ideal for the fast approaching cooler season ahead.

7 comments:

joy said...

I was inspired by this post to search the movie and it is on Netflix and will be at my door in a couple of days! Definitely doing a post about this film.

JD

Dan said...

Great post, I'd not seen anything from this fim before and it really does have some fantastic costumery, but I have to take issue with your description of it being set in northern England. I think you'll find Nottingham is in the East Midlands, unless you're getting into the old London cliche of everything north of Milton Keynes being "the north".

EJ said...

I told Steve only last week that Nottingham isn't the North! He needs better training, obviously...

Style Salvage Steve said...

Joy: Great stuff. I look forward to reading it.
Dan and EJ : Of course you are right! I am a complete Southern Fairy. The furthest North I've ever been is Sheffield. Apologies!

Anonymous said...

Great tie rack in the 3rd and 10th photos. Makes me wish I had studied DT

Miszelka said...

Beautiful, stylish pictures.

Giancinephile said...

Those film stills evoke a very enigmatic feeling and I like that.

Nothing beats black and white films with that certain graininess/noise.

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